Cannabis and driving
Browse the latest research linking medical marijuana / medicinal cannabis and driving.
Driving under the influence of cannabis
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Compounds Topics Title Date
cannabis driving via model Marijuana legalization and road safety: a panel study of US States May 2019
First, while treating both the state and the year as fixed effects, the resulting panel regression model estimates that the legalization of medical or recreational marijuana is not a predictor of the number of fatalities per 100,000 vehicle-miles traveled. Second, due to limitations in the regression model, a difference-in-difference analysis was conducted over the same period and found no relationship between legalization of medical marijuana and the number of fatalities per 100,000 vehicle-miles traveled. These findings suggest that concerns of policy makers and the public that legalizing marijuana will worsen road safety are not ungrounded at this time.
cannabis driving in humans via analysis (n=3005) Cannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study May 2019
Positive  In this sample of non-fatally injured motor vehicle drivers in British Columbia, Canada, there was no evidence of increased crash risk in drivers with THC<5ng/mL and a statistically non-significant increased risk of crash responsibility (OR=1.74) in drivers with THC>=5ng/mL.
THC,CBD driving in humans via placebo trial (n=14) Cannabidiol (CBD) content in vaporized cannabis does not prevent tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-induced impairment of driving and cognition May 2019
Ingestion Method: vaporzation 11% thc vs 11% thc+11%cbd
Negative  Both active cannabis types increased lane weaving during a car-following task but had little effect on other driving performance measures. Active cannabis types impaired performance on the Digit Symbol Substitution Task (DSST), Divided Attention Task (DAT) and Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT) with impairment on the latter two tasks worse with THC/CBD equivalent cannabis. Subjective drug effects (e.g., stoned) and confidence in driving ability did not vary with CBD content. Peak plasma THC concentrations were higher following THC/CBD equivalent cannabis relative to THC-dominant cannabis, suggesting a possible pharmacokinetic interaction.
cannabis driving in humans via study (n=3005) Cannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study. May 2019
In this sample of non-fatally injured motor vehicle drivers in British Columbia, Canada, there was no evidence of increased crash risk in drivers with THC<5ng/mL and a statistically non-significant increased risk of crash responsibility (OR=1.74) in drivers with THC>=5ng/mL.